Posts Tagged ‘Profitability’

Profits vs. Profitability: Why You Need to Track Profit Margins

You don’t need an MBA to know there are two basic ways to increase your profits: increase revenues or reduce costs. The smartest businesses implement marketing strategies and cost-cutting measures that do both, but far too many obsess so much over increased sales that they forget about the importance of trimming the fat, and end up actually reducing profits.

Profits Alone Can Be Deceiving

Anyone who’s taken a basic business course knows how to calculate profits. You add up total revenues and subtract total costs, and whatever’s left is your profit. But profit as a measure of business success can be deceiving. For example, Company A spends $900,000 to sell $1 million in products and services, generating $100,000 in profits. Company B spends $400,000 to generate $500,000. The two companies generate the same profit ($100,000), but are they equally profitable?

The simple answer is no. The more a company spends to generate a designated profit, the more vulnerable it is to minor cost shifts, which could quickly put it out of business. Let’s say Company A above spends $200,000 in health insurance costs, and those costs increase by 10 percent. That increases insurance costs by $20,000, reducing profits to $80,000. Company B spends $100,000 in health insurance costs. The 10 percent increase cuts into the bottom line by just $10,000, and profits drop to $90,000. Company B is now making $10,000 more in profit than Company A.

Profit Margins Provide a More Realistic Perspective

It’s important for businesses to track not only profit, but also profit margin. While profits are measured in dollars, the profit margin is measured as a percentage, or ratio, specifically, the ratio between net income (profit) and total sales.

Continuing the example above, Company A has $100,000 in net revenue and generates $1 million in total sales, so its profit margin is 100,000/1,000,000 or 10 percent. Company B also generates $100,000 in net revenue, but its total sales are $500,000, making the profit margin 20% (100,000/500,000). The two companies have the same amount of profit, but Company B is twice as profitable as Company A.

How to Increase Profit Margin

Because profit margin more accurately reflects long-term profitability and a business’s vulnerability to sudden increases in fixed costs (such as insurance, office expenses and taxes), it’s important to track profit margin and implement strategies, which keep it as high as possible.

There are basically two ways to increase a company’s profit margin. First, you can increase the price you charge for your products and services, but this must be done only after a careful analysis of the impact of those increased prices on consumer behavior and total sales. The second and much safer approach is to control costs.

The Importance of Cutting Costs

A minor decrease in costs will improve your profit margin more than a comparable increase in total sales. Company B in the scenario above spends $900,000 to generate $1 million in sales, giving it a profit of $100,000 and a profit margin of 10 percent. If the company increases sales by $50,000 (say, by increasing either pricing or customer base) but don’t decrease costs, its profit increases to $150,000, and the profit margin increases to 150,000/950,000, or 15.8 percent.

If it instead kept sales constant, but reduced cost by the same amount ($50,000), profits once again move to $150,000, but the profit margin now increases to 150,000/900,000, or 16.7 percent. Cutting costs has made Company B more profitable, and less vulnerable, than increasing sales, and it’s generally easier and less risky to reduce costs than to increase sales.

Conclusion

No single strategy is likely to increase a company’s profitability or prospects for long-term success. The most successful companies carefully analyze consumer behavior to determine the best price to charge for products, while simultaneously researching a range of fixed cost-cutting strategies, ranging from outsourcing non-critical job functions to downsizing to carefully researching health care options for their employees. A comprehensive analysis of both price and prudent cost-cutting measures has the greatest chance of increasing a company’s profitability and persistence.

 

Profits vs. Profitability: Why You Need to Track Profit Margins

You don’t need an MBA to know there are two basic ways to increase your profits: increase revenues or reduce costs. The smartest businesses implement marketing strategies and cost-cutting measures that do both, but far too many obsess so much over increased sales that they forget about the importance of trimming the fat, and end up actually reducing profits.

Profits Alone Can Be Deceiving

Anyone who’s taken a basic business course knows how to calculate profits. You add up total revenues and subtract total costs, and whatever’s left is your profit. But profit as a measure of business success can be deceiving. For example, Company A spends $900,000 to sell $1 million in products and services, generating $100,000 in profits. Company B spends $400,000 to generate $500,000. The two companies generate the same profit ($100,000), but are they equally profitable?

The simple answer is no. The more a company spends to generate a designated profit, the more vulnerable it is to minor cost shifts, which could quickly put it out of business. Let’s say Company A above spends $200,000 in health insurance costs, and those costs increase by 10 percent. That increases insurance costs by $20,000, reducing profits to $80,000. Company B spends $100,000 in health insurance costs. The 10 percent increase cuts into the bottom line by just $10,000, and profits drop to $90,000. Company B is now making $10,000 more in profit than Company A.

Profit Margins Provide a More Realistic Perspective

It’s important for businesses to track not only profit, but also profit margin. While profits are measured in dollars, the profit margin is measured as a percentage, or ratio, specifically, the ratio between net income (profit) and total sales.

Continuing the example above, Company A has $100,000 in net revenue and generates $1 million in total sales, so its profit margin is 100,000/1,000,000 or 10 percent. Company B also generates $100,000 in net revenue, but its total sales are $500,000, making the profit margin 20% (100,000/500,000). The two companies have the same amount of profit, but Company B is twice as profitable as Company A.

How to Increase Profit Margin

Because profit margin more accurately reflects long-term profitability and a business’s vulnerability to sudden increases in fixed costs (such as insurance, office expenses and taxes), it’s important to track profit margin and implement strategies, which keep it as high as possible.

There are basically two ways to increase a company’s profit margin. First, you can increase the price you charge for your products and services, but this must be done only after a careful analysis of the impact of those increased prices on consumer behavior and total sales. The second and much safer approach is to control costs.

The Importance of Cutting Costs

A minor decrease in costs will improve your profit margin more than a comparable increase in total sales. Company B in the scenario above spends $900,000 to generate $1 million in sales, giving it a profit of $100,000 and a profit margin of 10 percent. If the company increases sales by $50,000 (say, by increasing either pricing or customer base) but don’t decrease costs, its profit increases to $150,000, and the profit margin increases to 150,000/950,000, or 15.8 percent.

If it instead kept sales constant, but reduced cost by the same amount ($50,000), profits once again move to $150,000, but the profit margin now increases to 150,000/900,000, or 16.7 percent. Cutting costs has made Company B more profitable, and less vulnerable, than increasing sales, and it’s generally easier and less risky to reduce costs than to increase sales.

Conclusion

No single strategy is likely to increase a company’s profitability or prospects for long-term success. The most successful companies carefully analyze consumer behavior to determine the best price to charge for products, while simultaneously researching a range of fixed cost-cutting strategies, ranging from outsourcing non-critical job functions to downsizing to carefully researching health care options for their employees. A comprehensive analysis of both price and prudent cost-cutting measures has the greatest chance of increasing a company’s profitability and persistence.

 

Profits vs. Profitability: Why You Need to Track Profit Margins

You don’t need an MBA to know there are two basic ways to increase your profits: increase revenues or reduce costs. The smartest businesses implement marketing strategies and cost-cutting measures that do both, but far too many obsess so much over increased sales that they forget about the importance of trimming the fat, and end up actually reducing profits.

Profits Alone Can Be Deceiving

Anyone who’s taken a basic business course knows how to calculate profits. You add up total revenues and subtract total costs, and whatever’s left is your profit. But profit as a measure of business success can be deceiving. For example, Company A spends $900,000 to sell $1 million in products and services, generating $100,000 in profits. Company B spends $400,000 to generate $500,000. The two companies generate the same profit ($100,000), but are they equally profitable?

The simple answer is no. The more a company spends to generate a designated profit, the more vulnerable it is to minor cost shifts, which could quickly put it out of business. Let’s say Company A above spends $200,000 in health insurance costs, and those costs increase by 10 percent. That increases insurance costs by $20,000, reducing profits to $80,000. Company B spends $100,000 in health insurance costs. The 10 percent increase cuts into the bottom line by just $10,000, and profits drop to $90,000. Company B is now making $10,000 more in profit than Company A.

Profit Margins Provide a More Realistic Perspective

It’s important for businesses to track not only profit, but also profit margin. While profits are measured in dollars, the profit margin is measured as a percentage, or ratio, specifically, the ratio between net income (profit) and total sales.

Continuing the example above, Company A has $100,000 in net revenue and generates $1 million in total sales, so its profit margin is 100,000/1,000,000 or 10 percent. Company B also generates $100,000 in net revenue, but its total sales are $500,000, making the profit margin 20% (100,000/500,000). The two companies have the same amount of profit, but Company B is twice as profitable as Company A.

How to Increase Profit Margin

Because profit margin more accurately reflects long-term profitability and a business’s vulnerability to sudden increases in fixed costs (such as insurance, office expenses and taxes), it’s important to track profit margin and implement strategies, which keep it as high as possible.

There are basically two ways to increase a company’s profit margin. First, you can increase the price you charge for your products and services, but this must be done only after a careful analysis of the impact of those increased prices on consumer behavior and total sales. The second and much safer approach is to control costs.

The Importance of Cutting Costs

A minor decrease in costs will improve your profit margin more than a comparable increase in total sales. Company B in the scenario above spends $900,000 to generate $1 million in sales, giving it a profit of $100,000 and a profit margin of 10 percent. If the company increases sales by $50,000 (say, by increasing either pricing or customer base) but don’t decrease costs, its profit increases to $150,000, and the profit margin increases to 150,000/950,000, or 15.8 percent.

If it instead kept sales constant, but reduced cost by the same amount ($50,000), profits once again move to $150,000, but the profit margin now increases to 150,000/900,000, or 16.7 percent. Cutting costs has made Company B more profitable, and less vulnerable, than increasing sales, and it’s generally easier and less risky to reduce costs than to increase sales.

Conclusion

No single strategy is likely to increase a company’s profitability or prospects for long-term success. The most successful companies carefully analyze consumer behavior to determine the best price to charge for products, while simultaneously researching a range of fixed cost-cutting strategies, ranging from outsourcing non-critical job functions to downsizing to carefully researching health care options for their employees. A comprehensive analysis of both price and prudent cost-cutting measures has the greatest chance of increasing a company’s profitability and persistence.

 

Profits vs. Profitability: Why You Need to Track Profit Margins

You don’t need an MBA to know there are two basic ways to increase your profits: increase revenues or reduce costs. The smartest businesses implement marketing strategies and cost-cutting measures that do both, but far too many obsess so much over increased sales that they forget about the importance of trimming the fat, and end up actually reducing profits.

Profits Alone Can Be Deceiving

Anyone who’s taken a basic business course knows how to calculate profits. You add up total revenues and subtract total costs, and whatever’s left is your profit. But profit as a measure of business success can be deceiving. For example, Company A spends $900,000 to sell $1 million in products and services, generating $100,000 in profits. Company B spends $400,000 to generate $500,000. The two companies generate the same profit ($100,000), but are they equally profitable?

The simple answer is no. The more a company spends to generate a designated profit, the more vulnerable it is to minor cost shifts, which could quickly put it out of business. Let’s say Company A above spends $200,000 in health insurance costs, and those costs increase by 10 percent. That increases insurance costs by $20,000, reducing profits to $80,000. Company B spends $100,000 in health insurance costs. The 10 percent increase cuts into the bottom line by just $10,000, and profits drop to $90,000. Company B is now making $10,000 more in profit than Company A.

Profit Margins Provide a More Realistic Perspective

It’s important for businesses to track not only profit, but also profit margin. While profits are measured in dollars, the profit margin is measured as a percentage, or ratio, specifically, the ratio between net income (profit) and total sales.

Continuing the example above, Company A has $100,000 in net revenue and generates $1 million in total sales, so its profit margin is 100,000/1,000,000 or 10 percent. Company B also generates $100,000 in net revenue, but its total sales are $500,000, making the profit margin 20% (100,000/500,000). The two companies have the same amount of profit, but Company B is twice as profitable as Company A.

How to Increase Profit Margin

Because profit margin more accurately reflects long-term profitability and a business’s vulnerability to sudden increases in fixed costs (such as insurance, office expenses and taxes), it’s important to track profit margin and implement strategies, which keep it as high as possible.

There are basically two ways to increase a company’s profit margin. First, you can increase the price you charge for your products and services, but this must be done only after a careful analysis of the impact of those increased prices on consumer behavior and total sales. The second and much safer approach is to control costs.

The Importance of Cutting Costs

A minor decrease in costs will improve your profit margin more than a comparable increase in total sales. Company B in the scenario above spends $900,000 to generate $1 million in sales, giving it a profit of $100,000 and a profit margin of 10 percent. If the company increases sales by $50,000 (say, by increasing either pricing or customer base) but don’t decrease costs, its profit increases to $150,000, and the profit margin increases to 150,000/950,000, or 15.8 percent.

If it instead kept sales constant, but reduced cost by the same amount ($50,000), profits once again move to $150,000, but the profit margin now increases to 150,000/900,000, or 16.7 percent. Cutting costs has made Company B more profitable, and less vulnerable, than increasing sales, and it’s generally easier and less risky to reduce costs than to increase sales.

Conclusion

No single strategy is likely to increase a company’s profitability or prospects for long-term success. The most successful companies carefully analyze consumer behavior to determine the best price to charge for products, while simultaneously researching a range of fixed cost-cutting strategies, ranging from outsourcing non-critical job functions to downsizing to carefully researching health care options for their employees. A comprehensive analysis of both price and prudent cost-cutting measures has the greatest chance of increasing a company’s profitability and persistence.

 

Improving Profitability Using Resource Planning & Scheduling Software

To improve overall profitability of the organisation, it is critical to achieve more out of fewer resources as resources are major cost to the organisation. In other words it is important to maximise the utilisation of your existing resources. This becomes further crucial in case of human resources, who are major overhead in most of the industries around the world. Any improvement in human resource utilisation adds directly to the bottom line of the organisation and provides required competitive edge against its competitors. Human resource utilisation can be improved by planning and scheduling your resources efficiently and smartly. Traditionally this work is done manually or using resourcing spreadsheet or calendaring tools. These methods are no more efficient and responsive in the environment, where business dynamics are changing often.

So it is critical to have right resource planning and scheduling software, which is designed from scratch to manage and achieve improved utilisation of scarce resources.

Typically human resources in large size company are boxed within boundaries of departments, teams, projects, offices, cities, countries etc. This makes it very hard to have companywide visibility of resource capability and availability. Visibility gets further blocked when there is outsourcing to outside vendors and resources are located across the city or country boundaries. This lack of visibility adversely affects uniform work load distribution, maximisation of resource utilisation and accurate resource hiring and retraining. So it is very crucial to build up centralised system, which records and displays details about capability and availability of individual resources. Resource planning and scheduling software are specifically designed for this purpose.

Once there is companywide visibility of resource capability and availability, it becomes quite easy to identify the right resource for the right job at the right time. Right resource can be identified based on skill, role, training, availability, area of interest etc. This can be best achieved by dedicated resource planning and scheduling software, which can search the right resource instantly with click of button. Allocating right resource to the right job is a win-win situation for both employees and employers. This ultimately adds to the profitability of the company.

Besides above improvements, it is critical to measure and track utilisation of individual human resource across the organisation and balance work load. Information about resource utilisation should be readily available to identify over and under allocation of the resources. So that new work can be allocated and existing work can be easily reallocated to other resources across the organisation. This facilitates optimum utilisation of the resources adding to company profitability.

To improve long term profitability, it is critical to forecast future human resource requirements in line with future workload and long term corporate objective. This helps the company in recruiting right number of resources at right time in future, reorganise the workforce and retrain existing resources with new set of skills. Powerful resource planning and scheduling software can forecast resource requirements based on future workload and future strategic initiative of the company.

In short, company profitability can be improved using right resource planning and scheduling software, which can help identify the right resource for the right job, balance workload across the organisation, maximise utilisation of resources and accurately forecast future resource requirements. SAVIOM Resource Planning and Scheduling Software has been specifically designed from scratch for this purpose. This software is quite powerful, affordable and easy to use.

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