Archive for the ‘Book Review’ Category

New Book Claims True Leadership Lies in Acknowledging Human Imperfections

James Robilotta has held a variety of roles in his life from student leader to student affairs professional to stand-up comedian, public speaker, and personal life coach. Those experiences have given him the opportunity to lead, be led, and help develop new leaders, which ultimately led him to a powerful realization: “I see a problem in today’s developing leaders-they think they need to be someone they are not to get what they want. This mentality negatively impacts the way they communicate and build relationships with their peers, coworkers, and supervisors.”

James can see this fault because it’s one he’s admittedly had himself; for example, in high school he took on multiple leadership roles not because he was committed to being a leader but because of how it would look on his resume, and in college, he tried to dress well to fit in with popular ideas of what it meant to be “fresh.” Fortunately, James became aware of these faults and changed, as well as learned to laugh at himself and use these stories as examples to illustrate the importance of his message on leadership. Now in his new book, Leading Imperfectly: The Value of Being Authentic for Leaders, Professionals, and Humans Beings, James argues that the mistakes we make and our imperfections are where we learn our most valuable lessons; those character flaws are what eventually mold us into being successful leaders who are unafraid of sharing our imperfections.

The idea of imperfect leadership resonates for James because it gives us a human place to connect with others. He states that allowing ourselves to be imperfect “increases open and honest communication between all levels of the hierarchy because you will then be leading from a place of support and understanding instead of one of fear and pressure.”

Another way so many leaders pretend to be something other than they are is in the stories they tell. James is tired of hearing the same people held up as examples of greatness: “If I hear one more time that Michael Jordan got cut from his high school basketball team or that Wayne Gretzky said, ‘You miss 100 percent of the shots you don’t take,’ I may boil over.” He doesn’t deny that Susan B. Anthony, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and a string of other famous people accomplished wonderful things, but he believes we can’t reach the people we’re leading by giving them such examples to model themselves after. “Attempting to inspire a student, mentee, peer, family member, etc., by suggesting he or she be more like one of the individuals above makes as much sense as trying to motivate a small boy who wants to be a lumberjack with Paul Bunyan’s story. It’s an amazing tale, but it’s unrealistic. Instead, introduce that boy to the local logger who is climbing the ladder of success.” After all, “Today’s students will become us before they become the world’s future heroes.” Therefore, James says we need to tell our own stories and show we are human-and that’s where we’ll get the people we lead to connect with us.

In short, none of us is perfect, and when we pretend to be, people quit listening to us. Instead, we need to focus on trying to connect with others. Leading Imperfectly is full of examples for how to make those connections. The book is divided into a series of short, often humorous, and always insightful essays filled with real-life stories from James’ own life. Other topics discuss the importance of learning how to love others, how to prevent over-committing because you can’t be everything to everyone, realizing you don’t have all the answers, and some practical advice about the importance of valuing the time we have and giving that time to the most important people in our lives. James also challenges us to look at the lies we tell ourselves that hold us back in life, and to learn how to listen to others so they will listen to us. (I imagine he knows a lot about the importance of getting people to listen to you based on his improv experience.)

James’ humor provides comic relief in the middle of some of the more serious stories, but the humor always makes his examples hit home and keeps his stories memorable. I also appreciate that while he speaks as someone who has had success in life, his leadership background is not that of the typical leader who writes leadership books-he’s not a former company CEO or a famous athlete-and that makes his points stand out all the more. As James knows, we all are leaders in some way in our lives. We all are examples to someone and we often influence others in many ways. We may end up being a leader to the stranger we meet in the coffee shop or to a small child and never even know the power of our influence. As James states, “We all have the capacity to educate. I challenge you to take action. Own who you are so you can be real to others.”

After reading Leading Imperfectly, I feel less inclined to hide my faults and instead tell stories of how the mistakes I’ve made led me to where I am today. James encourages us to lead from our faults, and it’s advice we can all hear with relief and apply with better results for ourselves and everyone who might be watching or listening to us. Check out Leading Imperfectly. Between the chuckles, there’s quite a bit of wisdom that will stick with you long after you turn the last page.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Tyler_Tichelaar

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9120726

Go Pro: 7 Steps to Becoming a Network Marketing Professional, a Review

Eric Worre is a professional network marketing trainer who travels the world doing training events and coaching network marketers. Eric has been hugely successful with several companies. He is well-known for his Go Pro training videos on YouTube. Eric has a wealth of experience and he is an excellent communicator. The book is clear and concise.

In this book he goes more in-depth on telling his own story and how he worked through his struggles to become a professional network marketer and trainer. His story of struggle is one that most network marketers can relate to. He quickly identifies issues of rejection and discouragement that cause people to quit the business.

According to Eric in this business, what differentiates the professional from the amateur is the tendency for the amateur to give in to their discouragement and cease activity in their business when they don’t meet success quickly. The professional, on the other hand, realizes the need for training and learning new skills. They understand that starting in the business is not like winning a lottery ticket. The professional has an attitude of being teachable and is willing to make a plan to go the distance.

There was nothing new here regarding inviting skills. This is old information that Worre has published before. His method of being in a hurry is an old school tactic that can be a turn off to the prospect, who wants to know more about who you are and what you represent before they will say yes to taking a look.

It is not a comprehensive book as it does not treat at length various common issues such as handling objections or rejection that beset the individual. He says you must become indifferent to rejection and in a year you can become a professional, without revealing exactly how.

I found Mark Yarnell’s classic, Your First Year in Network Marketing more helpful because Yarnell calls it a numbers game, while Worre touches on this only briefly. In fact though, it is only by the experience of approaching many, many, many people that one becomes indifferent to rejection. And for the beginner those numbers may be way higher than the 250 that are in your warm market. Many give up before that point. Why not just say, this is a 3% business, even for a professional.

Nevertheless, Go Pro 7 Steps to Becoming a Network Marketing Professional is a worthwhile book for someone new to the NWM industry.

Deborah Gorman is an author, business mentor and life coach. To learn more, visit her blog at http://debgormanmentor.blogspot.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Deborah_F_Gorman

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/8879384

What Color Is Your Parachute?

If you are looking for a career change you will find reading the book What Color Is Your Parachute is a one stop guide to success. The reason I chose this book is because at age 47, I finally received my Bachelor’s Degree! What everyone needs to know in this new version of “What Color Is Your Parachute” is that to get a job in this era and in the future, the way to go about it is clearly written by the author. Bolles gives in chapter two some great advice including the reason why you need to Google your name. “Since 2008, or even before, there’s a new resume in town, and it’s called Google.” Everyone has a chance to join free social networks like LinkedIn, Twitter, Pinterest and others to create a great portfolio, business, reputation and resume. One big tip to do is research the job you are applying for! It helps to know about the company so that when the interview comes, you are prepared to answer questions about their organization.

I loved the flower diagram in the book as well as the many other templates where you can narrow down all that is needed to include in your personal profiles, portfolios, and the exercises that help you gain value to prospective employers. Chapter ten talks about making career changes with links and resources to help anyone make the transition. This is a great resource book to keep or give to a new graduate. I admire Bolles for his great expertise in the 100 best nonfiction books according to Time Magazine. So how do you get a job in a market with a slow economy that is currently taking place? Getting advice from authors, websites, friends, family or articles is a great resource but it’s better to reach out only to companies that fit your ideal career. Most important, prepare your resume to fit the job, with a cover letter and references. On a personal note I created a Weebly resume for my security career and it’s free! I wish to thank Blogging for Books for a free copy of this book in order to post an honest review.

TIPS:

Take some personality tests to find out what jobs would suit you best online.

Remember you are “interviewing” them as they are to you.

Never ever give up on your job hunting and it’s best to pursue a job that you have a passion for.

Jackie Paulson does professional book reviews for authors to help them by promoting through social networks like Amazon. In addition she has a Bachelor’s degree in Technical Business management and has owned an operated a barer shop in her past.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jackie_Ann_Paulson

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/8818507

New Book Will Be Artist’s Best Friend for Career and Life

Anyone who thinks you cannot make a living as an artist had better think again because Heather Allen is not only here to prove that old myth wrong, but she is ready to share common sense about being an entrepreneur and how to make a career out of your passion.

As a self-employed author myself, I wish I had been able to read this book when I first set off to support myself through writing and related activities. Let Your Creativity Work for You is the perfect guide for anyone who wants to set up a business, who wants to make a living through his or her artwork, and who isn’t afraid of making money or being a success. It’s time for people to quit thinking that being an artist means having to starve in a garret. Great artists deserve to be appreciated and make a viable living, and the world deserves great art to make it a better place.

Early on, Heather addresses this issue through one of the many artists she interviews, Jason Hoelscher. She states, “They didn’t have professional development classes when Jason Hoelscher was an undergraduate. In fine arts studies courses, the notion of combining artistic skill development with career and income opportunities remains, as it has historically, off limits.” However, Jason reveals that artist solopreneurs can be successful by doing three things:
1. You must be strategic in your approach.
2. You must do your research.
3. You must be in it for the long haul.

From this both inspirational and down to earth beginning, Heather walks readers through everything imaginable that a business person and artist needs to know. Chief among these is setting goals, and then making them achievable through five, two, and one year plans. She includes goal sheets and other activity spaces throughout the book for the reader to fill out and do exercises to motivate and make the advice in the book applicable.

From there, Heather gets into some of the real nitty-gritty of running a business, including tracking mileage for travel, taking credit card payments, and using a CRM (Customer Relationship Management) program. But she never gets too caught up in details to overlook the bigger picture of being an artist who needs an income. She discusses how to balance producing your art with the details of running a business, how to create multiple sources of income, the importance of branding, how to use social media and websites to promote your art and business, and one of the most difficult of all subjects: how to set boundaries with clients, be direct about expectations with them, and even maintain a waiting list for your services.

Personally, I especially enjoyed the interviews Heather conducts with successful artists of various mediums, both in terms of their artistic processes and their approaches to running a business and maintaining a successful career. Through these various perspectives, readers learn just what it is to be an artist, what kinds of joys and pitfalls they can expect, and how to create a business that is full of values and principles as well as fun, nourishing their artistic souls without turning their artwork into drudgery to please clients. I especially appreciated the discussion of principles. Here are some principles she suggests artists may incorporate into their businesses:
– I will treat others as I would like to be treated.
– My collectors are my most valuable business partners.
– If I say I’m going to do something, I can be counted on to follow through.
– I will commit 100% to projects based on the joy and/or revenue they bring me.
– I will donate artworks to organizations that support ____.
– To honor the investment of my collectors, I will not donate or discount my work.
– Once my pricing is set, it can only increase-never decrease.

Most importantly, Heather reminds artists to be true to themselves. As gallerist Michael Foley states in the book, artists need to ask themselves, “Does the work mean something to you? Are you passionate about it? It needs to be your personal meaning for you, as opposed to what you think will sell.”

Anyone who dreams of becoming an artist or is an artist already trying to make a living needs to read this book. I would love to see this book adopted as required reading material in all college art programs across the world, and probably also in music and creative writing and other artistic fields. It truly contains what people rarely are taught in school. Heather Allen has learned all this information through experience and through being a consultant to creative businesspeople for several years. I am sure countless artists like myself will be grateful to her for now sharing all of her invaluable information in these pages.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Tyler_Tichelaar

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/8906831

New Book Claims True Leadership Lies in Acknowledging Human Imperfections

 

James Robilotta has held a variety of roles in his life from student leader to student affairs professional to stand-up comedian, public speaker, and personal life coach. Those experiences have given him the opportunity to lead, be led, and help develop new leaders, which ultimately led him to a powerful realization: “I see a problem in today’s developing leaders-they think they need to be someone they are not to get what they want. This mentality negatively impacts the way they communicate and build relationships with their peers, coworkers, and supervisors.”

James can see this fault because it’s one he’s admittedly had himself; for example, in high school he took on multiple leadership roles not because he was committed to being a leader but because of how it would look on his resume, and in college, he tried to dress well to fit in with popular ideas of what it meant to be “fresh.” Fortunately, James became aware of these faults and changed, as well as learned to laugh at himself and use these stories as examples to illustrate the importance of his message on leadership. Now in his new book, Leading Imperfectly: The Value of Being Authentic for Leaders, Professionals, and Humans Beings, James argues that the mistakes we make and our imperfections are where we learn our most valuable lessons; those character flaws are what eventually mold us into being successful leaders who are unafraid of sharing our imperfections.

The idea of imperfect leadership resonates for James because it gives us a human place to connect with others. He states that allowing ourselves to be imperfect “increases open and honest communication between all levels of the hierarchy because you will then be leading from a place of support and understanding instead of one of fear and pressure.”

Another way so many leaders pretend to be something other than they are is in the stories they tell. James is tired of hearing the same people held up as examples of greatness: “If I hear one more time that Michael Jordan got cut from his high school basketball team or that Wayne Gretzky said, ‘You miss 100 percent of the shots you don’t take,’ I may boil over.” He doesn’t deny that Susan B. Anthony, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and a string of other famous people accomplished wonderful things, but he believes we can’t reach the people we’re leading by giving them such examples to model themselves after. “Attempting to inspire a student, mentee, peer, family member, etc., by suggesting he or she be more like one of the individuals above makes as much sense as trying to motivate a small boy who wants to be a lumberjack with Paul Bunyan’s story. It’s an amazing tale, but it’s unrealistic. Instead, introduce that boy to the local logger who is climbing the ladder of success.” After all, “Today’s students will become us before they become the world’s future heroes.” Therefore, James says we need to tell our own stories and show we are human-and that’s where we’ll get the people we lead to connect with us.

In short, none of us is perfect, and when we pretend to be, people quit listening to us. Instead, we need to focus on trying to connect with others. Leading Imperfectly is full of examples for how to make those connections. The book is divided into a series of short, often humorous, and always insightful essays filled with real-life stories from James’ own life. Other topics discuss the importance of learning how to love others, how to prevent over-committing because you can’t be everything to everyone, realizing you don’t have all the answers, and some practical advice about the importance of valuing the time we have and giving that time to the most important people in our lives. James also challenges us to look at the lies we tell ourselves that hold us back in life, and to learn how to listen to others so they will listen to us. (I imagine he knows a lot about the importance of getting people to listen to you based on his improv experience.)

James’ humor provides comic relief in the middle of some of the more serious stories, but the humor always makes his examples hit home and keeps his stories memorable. I also appreciate that while he speaks as someone who has had success in life, his leadership background is not that of the typical leader who writes leadership books-he’s not a former company CEO or a famous athlete-and that makes his points stand out all the more. As James knows, we all are leaders in some way in our lives. We all are examples to someone and we often influence others in many ways. We may end up being a leader to the stranger we meet in the coffee shop or to a small child and never even know the power of our influence. As James states, “We all have the capacity to educate. I challenge you to take action. Own who you are so you can be real to others.”

After reading Leading Imperfectly, I feel less inclined to hide my faults and instead tell stories of how the mistakes I’ve made led me to where I am today. James encourages us to lead from our faults, and it’s advice we can all hear with relief and apply with better results for ourselves and everyone who might be watching or listening to us. Check out Leading Imperfectly. Between the chuckles, there’s quite a bit of wisdom that will stick with you long after you turn the last page.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Tyler_Tichelaar

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9120726

Go Pro: 7 Steps to Becoming a Network Marketing Professional, a Review

Eric Worre is a professional network marketing trainer who travels the world doing training events and coaching network marketers. Eric has been hugely successful with several companies. He is well-known for his Go Pro training videos on YouTube. Eric has a wealth of experience and he is an excellent communicator. The book is clear and concise.

In this book he goes more in-depth on telling his own story and how he worked through his struggles to become a professional network marketer and trainer. His story of struggle is one that most network marketers can relate to. He quickly identifies issues of rejection and discouragement that cause people to quit the business.

According to Eric in this business, what differentiates the professional from the amateur is the tendency for the amateur to give in to their discouragement and cease activity in their business when they don’t meet success quickly. The professional, on the other hand, realizes the need for training and learning new skills. They understand that starting in the business is not like winning a lottery ticket. The professional has an attitude of being teachable and is willing to make a plan to go the distance.

There was nothing new here regarding inviting skills. This is old information that Worre has published before. His method of being in a hurry is an old school tactic that can be a turn off to the prospect, who wants to know more about who you are and what you represent before they will say yes to taking a look.

It is not a comprehensive book as it does not treat at length various common issues such as handling objections or rejection that beset the individual. He says you must become indifferent to rejection and in a year you can become a professional, without revealing exactly how.

I found Mark Yarnell’s classic, Your First Year in Network Marketing more helpful because Yarnell calls it a numbers game, while Worre touches on this only briefly. In fact though, it is only by the experience of approaching many, many, many people that one becomes indifferent to rejection. And for the beginner those numbers may be way higher than the 250 that are in your warm market. Many give up before that point. Why not just say, this is a 3% business, even for a professional.

Nevertheless, Go Pro 7 Steps to Becoming a Network Marketing Professional is a worthwhile book for someone new to the NWM industry.

Deborah Gorman is an author, business mentor and life coach. To learn more, visit her blog at http://debgormanmentor.blogspot.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Deborah_F_Gorman

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/8879384

What Color Is Your Parachute?

If you are looking for a career change you will find reading the book What Color Is Your Parachute is a one stop guide to success. The reason I chose this book is because at age 47, I finally received my Bachelor’s Degree! What everyone needs to know in this new version of “What Color Is Your Parachute” is that to get a job in this era and in the future, the way to go about it is clearly written by the author. Bolles gives in chapter two some great advice including the reason why you need to Google your name. “Since 2008, or even before, there’s a new resume in town, and it’s called Google.” Everyone has a chance to join free social networks like LinkedIn, Twitter, Pinterest and others to create a great portfolio, business, reputation and resume. One big tip to do is research the job you are applying for! It helps to know about the company so that when the interview comes, you are prepared to answer questions about their organization.

I loved the flower diagram in the book as well as the many other templates where you can narrow down all that is needed to include in your personal profiles, portfolios, and the exercises that help you gain value to prospective employers. Chapter ten talks about making career changes with links and resources to help anyone make the transition. This is a great resource book to keep or give to a new graduate. I admire Bolles for his great expertise in the 100 best nonfiction books according to Time Magazine. So how do you get a job in a market with a slow economy that is currently taking place? Getting advice from authors, websites, friends, family or articles is a great resource but it’s better to reach out only to companies that fit your ideal career. Most important, prepare your resume to fit the job, with a cover letter and references. On a personal note I created a Weebly resume for my security career and it’s free! I wish to thank Blogging for Books for a free copy of this book in order to post an honest review.

TIPS:

Take some personality tests to find out what jobs would suit you best online.

Remember you are “interviewing” them as they are to you.

Never ever give up on your job hunting and it’s best to pursue a job that you have a passion for.

Jackie Paulson does professional book reviews for authors to help them by promoting through social networks like Amazon. In addition she has a Bachelor’s degree in Technical Business management and has owned an operated a barer shop in her past.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jackie_Ann_Paulson

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/8818507
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